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Catalonia, Spain, and Europe are Much Better Together

Last updated on November 7, 2019

Most importantly, Europe is liberty, peace, and advancement. We have to proceed with all these principles and make Europe the major model of integration and social justice which protects its citizens. The Europe we hope to, the Europe we desire, the Europe we are building is based on civic equilibrium within member nations and can’t accept the unilateral violation of its integrity.

Because of this, the struggle of separatism from Catalonia, invented against and out Spain’s constitutional frame, and silencing the vast majority of Catalans that are against liberty, is a struggle for Europe and Europeans. Maintaining these values in Catalonia now means protecting the democratic and open Europe where we endure.

Spain enshrined the principles in 1978, as it established and ratified a democratic constitution. That historical document was supported by nearly 88 percent of respondents at a referendum. In Catalonia, service and turnout were even greater: a few 90.5percent of Catalans endorsed the new constitution.

Spain hence escaped the dark and long shadow of dictatorship and put the foundations for a country based on the principle of law, akin today with all the long-established democracies of Western Europe. Individual liberty, fought and won by Spaniards of varied backgrounds and beliefs, such as many Catalans, were revived. Some 40 decades after, the Democracy Index, released by The Economist, prices Spain among the planet’s 20 complete democracies.

Contemporary Spain is Europe’s second-largest decentralized state, also Catalonia enjoys some of the greatest degrees of regional self-governance in the world, together with extensive devolved powers over key sectors such as the public and media communication, wellness, education, and prisons.

Nowadays, Catalonia is correlated not just with the soul of imagination and initiative, attributes which are widely admired across the world, but also with a deep crisis, brought on by the unilateral violation of Spain’s inherent order caused by the area’s separatist leaders in the fall of 2017.
These days, however, Catalonia is correlated not just with the soul of imagination and initiative, attributes which are widely admired across the world, but also with a deep crisis, brought on by the unilateral violation of Spain’s inherent order caused by the area’s separatist leaders in the fall of 2017. Catalonia’s leaders reneged on most of the resolutions and requirements set from the Constitutional Court, handed unconstitutional”disconnection” legislation in the Spanish country, held an illegal referendum, also announced that a supposed Catalan Republic.

No nation would allow the unilateral secession of a land that forms part of its inherent order. Their fraudulent liberty bid deprived popular fires and, aided by the intentional proliferation of bogus information, encouraged a deep sense of injustice and confrontation with the rest of Spain. Where has been the voice and the vote of these Catalans, most, who compared independence? Where has been the voice of these Spaniards who seemed on, puzzled, in an immediate breach of the Constitution’s promises?

International associations have recognized that the high standards we’ve put on problems like gender equality. We’d never, therefore, agree to the smallest limitation of liberty of expression.

The same goes for separatist regional councils and authorities, and for institutions that encourage liberty. They can express their views as they want, given that, they don’t market and encourage criminal actions.

Under Spain’s democratic principle of law, the judiciary is completely independent and permits its inspection of rulings by federal and global authorities. Including the Supreme Court’s judgment against nine separatist leaders billed for the illegal actions they completed in the fall of 2017. If so, the Court acted with the best transparency: the whole proceedings were televised live.

Though a few of those protests are peaceful, others have escalated to intense violence.

The rights to protest and to attack are basic pillars of democracy, and I completely respect those Catalan taxpayers that have exercised this right. However, the coordinated and deliberate acts of violence which have happened across Catalonia lately are something different entirely and in no way represent the area’s tolerance and welcoming soul.

The prohibited attempt to attract about Catalonia’s liberty has followed a roadmap that’s so familiar in modern Europe. It’s precisely the identical route taken by people who split societies by harnessing the rhetoric of response to promote polarization and confrontation.

Recently, leaders of the movement, like the president of the key pro-separatist institution, have said that violence could be crucial due to their origin to get increased attention. However, if we’ve heard anything in Europe’s painful and bloody history, it’s that no political dream can justify resorting to violence, less the normalization of violence as a political instrument.

My government has reacted to the challenge with control and percentage. We responded with pace to revive peace and stability into Catalonia’s taxpayers, the vast majority of whom refuse the present unstable impasse. We also acted with prudence to lessen the danger arising from minutes of tension into the lowest possible degree. And we shouldn’t overlook the exemplary efforts and bravery of the police, together with assistance from the federal police, in preserving order in a period when their area’s leaders were openly contemptuous of law.

It’s an absurd paradox to see a president of the Generalitat making light of this violence whilst denouncing a police force, which acts on his requests, for accomplishing its obligation. Additionally, it is a grave mistake. I call on him to condemn the violence entirely and clearly and to establish a dialog with the Catalan men and women who don’t need freedom, and with these parties which aren’t pro-separatist. He has to start to function as president of Catalans, not just of people who talk about his political beliefs.

I won’t permit another intense governmental outbreak, fueled by fictitious narratives and teeming with lies, to undermine the achievement of Spanish democracy, which our citizens and associations have worked hard to realize.
I won’t permit another intense governmental outbreak, fueled by fictitious narratives and teeming with lies, to undermine the achievement of Spanish democracy, which our citizens and associations have worked hard to realize. From the conversation about the future of Catalonia, just the healing and coexistence of the people and society, not liberty, is on the schedule. This is our principal challenge: to make sure that all know and accept a unilateral route toward liberty constitutes a direct affront to basic democratic principles.

At this time, moderation and restraint are imperative. We’ll act with the stability required to shield peaceful coexistence, but using all the wisdom to realize that we’ve got a chance to initiate a new chapter. I’ve not turned off from dialog if the two parties are ready to act within the framework of this Constitution and the law.

There are distinct regions of dialog to be researched when the separatist leaders leave their unilateral path. We can talk and listen to each other without risks or belittlement. I am aware there are open wounds, which there’s frustration and pain. However, despite this, there’s a chance for hope, realizing what we have achieved together and considering what we can do, collectively, to enhance the wellbeing of our citizens. For this to occur, but the separatist leaders should come back to the domain name of this Constitution and respect for the rule of law.

My government has put Spain at the forefront of this job of European integration, also on the front line of this struggle against our biggest global challenges. We’re devoted to the strengthening and expansion of liberty and rights, and the struggle against inequality. These goals surpass a civic vision, and also we want Catalonia and Catalan society to help attain them.