Press "Enter" to skip to content

TikTok Signals up to EU code of conduct online hate speech

The favorite video-sharing app TikTok has combined the EU code of conduct from internet hate speech.

“Our final purpose is to eliminate hatred on TikTok,” said Cormac Keenan, head of safety and information security at TikTok, at an announcement.

“We all know that this might look like an insurmountable challenge (…) however we do not think that it should prevent us from trying,” he added.

“We’ve never permitted hate on TikTok, and we think it is significant that net platforms are held to account on an issue as critical as this.

The move was welcomed by senior figures within the European Commission, who state the platform has produced a”positive step”.

“The EU needs strong collaboration with such prominent celebrities to produce the electronic environment a safe place for everybody.”

Commission vice-president Vera Jourova also welcomed the move, stressing that”youthful users are especially vulnerable to internet misuse and illegal hate speech”.

TikTok, possessed by the Chinese team Bytedance, has been criticized for its lack of content and signed in June into the EU code of practice against online disinformation.

The program has also been the subject of investigations in Europe about its use of private data.

“I anticipate TikTok not just to stick to the fundamentals of this code but also to fully honor EU law when working on European soil,” explained Vera Jourova on Twitter.

TikTok is your ninth spouse to combine the Code of Conduct, that has been established by the European Commission in 2016 along with Facebook, Microsoft, Twitter, and Google.

In reaction to the proliferation of racist and xenophobic language on the internet, the EU works together with civil society organizations and federal authorities to track how platforms are employing rules on internet hate speech.

Instagram, Snapchat, YouTube, Dailymotion, and Jeuxvideo.com will also be signed to the Code of Conduct.

At the most recent evaluation printed in June, the European Commission states that the results of this Code of Conduct have been”overall favorable”.

Tech companies are analyzing 90 percent of flagged content within one day and eliminating 71 percent of their material deemed to be illegal hate language, as stated by the Commission.

But programs are cautioned to be transparent to customers when handling online hate speech, and make sure that searchable content is assessed consistently with time.